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presidential election in the united states, there was something if he went through their public and primaries that people were saying it's not this person. tim pawlenty drops out and then michele bachmann drops out and then newt gingrich drops out and eventually you are left with the last person standing. it's not about picking a winner. it's about picking losers. this is not the 1 -- person and finally gets the last person standing. >> host: a process of elimination, which is consistent in whatever organization it is. >> guest: i think it is in the sense that it's a simplified version of reality, that i think you used to build very. theory star simple and you make a more complex but if you take ge. ge is famous for the way it chooses leaders. we always tell her students, ge is the company that works in practice but not in theory. it doesn't seem to do anything as we say it should do but it is profitable and successful. if you had to pick ge's core competency it seems to be it's good at picking leaders and developing managers in training managers and picking the right people. ge spends 20 y
's filtration processes. the most recent presidential election in the united states. there was something, if you went through the republican primaries, that people were saying, well, it's not this person. it's not -- tim drops out after the iowa caucuses and michele bachmann, and newt gingrich, and you're left with a last person standing. most often, it's not about picking a winner, but it's about picking losers. this is not the person. this is not the person, and finally, you get a last person standing. >> host: process of elimination. >> guest: exactly. >> host: which is consistent in whatever organization it is? >> guest: so -- >> host: has to be? >> guest: i think it is in the sense that it's a platonic idea, a simp fied # version of reality that i think you use to build theory. start with simple and make them more complex, but if you take, say, ge. so ge is famous for the way it chooses leaders. ge, we always tell students ge is a company that works in practice, but not in theory. it doesn't seem to do anything of the things we say it should do, but it's incredibly profit l and successful.
. let me give you the phone numbers again. how did you vote in the last election? did you vote with the intention of one-party rule in your state legislature? what are your priorities, if so? let me read this -- on a federal level, folks believe a divided government has republicans in control of the house and democrats in control of the senate and president obama reelected to a second term in the white house. on a federal level, people believed compromise is possible. not so, says the new york times, on the state level. what are your thoughts on this? we also posted the question on our facebook page. we have a couple comments -- you can post your comments as well on facebook if you want to participate that way, or send us an e-mail or a tweet. this is inside the new york times and they have a chart showing the outcomes of the 2012 elections -- that's how it breaks down. norma is a democrat in st. petersburg, florida. what is your state legislature like and what are your priorities? caller: i voted democratic. i believe that obama offered than did the republican party. the candi
clip] >> i want to thank every american who participated in this election. [applause] whether you voted for the very first time -- [cheers and applause] -- or waited in long for a very long time -- by the way, we have to fix that. host: we are talking about remedies to speed up the voting process. the first call comes from michael in oregon on the line for democrats. caller: we have a very simple process here. they send us -- we get a letter in the mail. it says who we have to vote for and we send it back in. host: so there is no waiting in line? caller: none. host: do you feel like that is the best way to go? caller: i think it is great. all you have to do is register. make sure that your address is registered. they send you a ballot in the mail and you send it back in. host: our next call comes from larry on the line for independent. give me a remedy to speed of the voting process. caller: i think we could probably moved it to veterans day -- november 11. a couple of days around it. three days of voting, kind of like a national holiday. the other way i think is, i really like what the
before when the early voting numbers look good for us. >> you thought it long before the election. i know that. [laughter] >> but i was pretty sure -- >> how long? could he have one after the first debate or where the forces in motion? >> sure, absolutely he could have one. -- won. it was competitive the entire way. i think governor romney could have one up until the end. i always believe in the fundamental truth, we were building the best grass roots campaign in modern political history. we had the best candidate and the best message. >> in a way, the story of this election is the degree to which replicated the 2008 results. many people thought that 2008 was a once-in-a-lifetime result. you came very close to replicating it. i think the most fascinating statistic is african-americans in ohio, 11% of the electorate, 15% this time. you found 200,000 more african- american voters who turned out for you. mitt romney lost the state by 103,000. that was the election, right there. finding those extra african american voters. >> let me back up. we won this election because of barack obama. peopl
. after that, more about the election with president obama's campaign master. later -- the evolution of facebook. >> the average new facebook user is in india or indonesia or brazil right now. they're using a mobile phone primarily to access facebook because they have not had access to a broad band connection. in a lot of cases there is not an infrastructure media of communications you have in the u.s. and lot of americans will leave me and say facebook is great for gossiping and to see what my friends are in for lunch, but if you were to talk to somebody in the middle east, maybe, you would hear a different story -- facebook was providing access to news, people that had unique access to information that they were not able to get out otherwise. you get a much more meaty story about what facebook means to them. >> facebook engineer chris cox with an insider's view of the company -- thanksgiving day on c-span. at 2:00 -- 2:00, chief justice john roberts. later, space pioneers and nash at -- nasa officials pay amash to the first man to walk on the moon, neil armstrong. >> federer reserv
was elected to the board in november of 2008 and has served as board president since january of 2009. we will get to know him and talk about the toughest issues facing them. thank you for joining us today. tell us about your background. >> my parents immigrated to the united states in the 1960's. i was the first kid born in the u.s. my parents sacrificed everything so that their kids could have the opportunities that they wanted when they came here. i grew up in the boston area and lived in different parts of boston. i went to catholic price school in dorchester, a section of boston. -- i went to catholic high school in dorchester, a section of boston. because of my parents, my brothers and i were all blessed to go to harvard university. that is where i went to school. it was intense. i stayed there for law school and have a master's in public policy from there. those are subjects i decided to study because i was interested in public service and public policy issues and government. >> you grew up in the boston area. what made you want to make the transition and moved to san francisco? wh
seeking re-election. >>> and now for a look at your national weather, let's turn to nbc meteorologist bill karins. he's tracking that weather channel forecast. good morning to you, bill. >> sensitive topic when you start comparing storms to katrina and all these. >> it does. >> it's like any big event. >> absolutely. >> yeah, over 1,000 people died and monetarily there's issued. every storm is different as we learned with sandy and all the other big hurricanes that have hit this country. we're not dealing with anything too bad today. if you have travel plans on the east coast, pay attention because as you go to work, no issues. but as you come home, you could be doing it in the snow in a few spots. we're going to watch temperatures closely because notice how cold it is up there in albany, hartford and boston. in any snow does fall, it probably wouldn't accumulate on the pavement. still hovering around 40. so whatever falls should melt throughout the morning and especially during the afternoon. here's the winter radar. this is our little weak storm. the white shows you where the snow is. th
is already one of the most volatile regions of the world, mohamed morsi, the newly elected president and head of the muslim brotherhood giving himself near absolute power at the expense of egypt's courts and the country's justices firing back calling for a strike and protests until his decree is rescinded. and, there is this: a warning from a prominent opposition leader, that egypt's military may be forced to get involved against president morsi's wishes in an effort to restore order. let's begin with steve harrigan streaming live from cairo, protesters in full force in tahrir square, do you have any idea what is next for them? >> reporter: harris, what we are likely to see on sunday and tuesday, are, perhaps, massive street protests, not just by those who want to oust mohamed morsi, who think he's trying to become a dictator but those who support him, who think he is trying to do the right thing to dry and break the logjam and get rid of the old regime, we could see tens of thousands of people marching on the streets of cairo with opposite points of view, really, close problems im to each ot
by the age of 17 is planning to be elected attorney general of arkansas and governor of arkansas and then president of the united states. this is something which everyone you knows him knows about because he talks about it all the time. he goes to georgetown and from georgetown he becomes a candidate for a rhodes fellowship and goes to -- he cannot have a sustained ongoing relationship with a woman. he is attracted to the kind of women his mother directs him to gore the beauty queens, who are the ones who are flirtatious and who are attractive and that is really where his eyes had been. and tell the goes to yale law school. there he meets hillary rodham. >> you can watch this and other programs on line at booktv.org. now on booktv, nicole eustace examines the effects the war of 1812 had on american politics and patriotism. the author reports at the end of the three year war resulted in the quote era of good feelings marked by defuse partisanship and greater nationalism. it's a little over an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much for that introduction and thank you to the david
thank you for doing this. i'm here with my political philosophy elective and we are looking for some terms to discuss the broad issues at play. i am wondering what are the best set of terms to discuss a policy failure, like the war on drugs? is it simply a question of return on the best meant that the money spent versus results seen or a question of the rapid expansion of government? is there a more moral dimension? the incredible rise of incarceration rates that have had a profound affect on certain committees? what are the best terms to discuss this question? >> all of those of very good terms. another i would add -- it has to do with cell definition 3 who are we at the people, as a society? the war on drugs has been going on for 42 years. i do not know any other war we would tolerate going on for so long that we will losing in spending so much money on. as a people, we are a civilization that believes he should not do things that are bad for you and that for society. that was a big motivation behind prohibition as well. this matter of what you believe is more important wh
they opened election day, shannon. >> thank you, anna. >> and this will probably be the last thanksgiving with large numbers of american combat troops in afghanistan. about 66,000 service members are still there and they celebrated thanksgiving with some of the holiday trappings of home. most americans troops are supposed to be out of the country by the end of 2014. the salvation army in canada says it's been overwhelmed by offers of help, following the theft of 2 million dollars for toys and donations and it's believed as many as 100,000 items are for the organizations to run a warehouse over a two year period. and a local toy company is donating $100,000 worth of toys and the salvation army in ottawa have been fired. of course donations like those here in america are like those tax deductible and with the u.s. approaching a fiscal cliff, there are rumblings of big changes and some could impact charity. the and here is the national correspondent tim angle. >> thanksgiving, a time to relish one's blessings and help the less fortunate. >> in the scramble to avoid the fiscal cliff, both the
since the election. there's no doubt about it. i think john, you'd verify this. number of republicans, i've talked to a couple of united states senators who said there's at least 10 to 12 republican senators who are willing to walk away from grover norquist on the tax pledge. >> it's breaking out all over. sanity is contagious. >> now, the question is, is the president going to stay where he is and go, you know what? we're going to do it my way or no other way? we're going to raise it to 90 -- to 39.6%. steve rattner had a great column yesterday. >> it's a must-read. >> you know there's more than one way to skin a cat, more than one way to raise over a trillion dollars in revenues. it doesn't just have to be the president's way. is the white house going to insist on the 39.6% tax rate, or will they consider the loophole part of it plus capital gains, plus a couple of other things? >> well, it looks to me like the white house has learned something over the course of the last four years which is that you don't start a negotiation by negotiating against yourself. >> right. >> you know, the
, in a statement says, elected officials from both parties need to listen to the will of the voters and focus on rebuilding the middle class and strengthening our economy by investing in jobs, not cuts. on the other side, conservatives say it's not a game changer because from unions, this is really nothing new. >> the fact they are publicly saying what they have been privately saying is helpful the american people understand where obama's intransigence comes from, but nothing's changed. >> they negotiated details this week of the grand fiscal cliff compromise that democrats and republicans hope to reach. lawmakers back in town neex week, and there's a meeting loosely scheduled in the white house against top democrats and republicans in congress with president obama. dagen? dagen: thank you so much, happy thanksgiving, my man. down in washington, d.c., but here in studio with my, monica crowely, author of "what the bleep just happened?" how do they have influence over the white house and represent in terms of the private job market a tiny sliver of employees in the country? >> it really is inc
-time schedules of the c-span networks. senior democratic and republican strategist analyze the 2012 election. c-span 2, a new stage of like discussion for baby boomers and what it means for employment and entitlement policy. c-span 3 a look at the u.s. pretences them and budgetary concerns. all of these that it o'clock eastern on the c-span networks. here on c-span, a program from "atlantic" magazine. and reached water talks about her cover story on the topic. that is that 9:00 eastern. -- at 9:35 eastern. >> go and find your soldiers and the labor market. the villages and towns of america. we did that. over five or six years we created an absolutely splendid force of young men and women willing to serve their country as volunteers. they had the same tradition, the same culture, loyalty and dedication of any other generation of americans that have ever gone before. they proved themselves in the gulf war, panama invasion, and iraq st 10 years anin and get a stand. we it to keep in mind is something prado begin said -- president lincoln said. it means never forget they are carrying the american s
of the national security threats is the question of whether or not the leaders we elect can, in fact, govern and can, in fact, deal with the challenges that face this country. when i go abroad -- i just came back from asia and i was meeting with the defense ministers and one of them said it's great you are rebalancing the pacific, but can you sustain that when you have a congress that is prepared to do sequester or walk off a fiscal cliff? and i said, you know, that issue of whether our democracy can truly function and have leaders that are prepared to make the decisions that have to be made in order for this country to govern itself is, i think, you know the issue that will determine ultimately whether we have national security. and it's the same way with the law of the seas. i go to the asia pacific region and they are having territorial dispute over these rocks out there -- [laughter] >> obviously, it's about the resources that are offshore those rocks. but they are having these dispute over these areas. and what are -- one of the arguments i make is, wait a minute. we have to maintain fr
♪ in the senate election he'll do more for you and me ♪ look at kennedy's history ♪ you'll see it's no mystery ♪ he's your kind of man so do all that you can ♪ and vote for kennedy ♪ >> we added the pictures and photographs ourselves. but that's a part of the c.d.'s that you get with the book. >> it is. >> how come that's in that? >> well, it's audio and it's great. it's evocative of a time really before tv. kennedy came out of politics before television was as important as it became, and then he rode the importance of tv very effectively. but that's from an earlier time, 1952. tv existed, but not many americans had it. music was really important to politics, both on radio and then even at events, where people would sing. and so like any politician, he need add theme song, and in 1952 he was running for senate for the first time and had a very well-organized campaign and had to have a song. i guess the short answer to your question is i listen to a lot of audio. the tapes themselves coming out of the white house. but then there were a lost audiotapes of kennedy speaking into a dictaphone
an important impact on the economy. >> both parties in the run-up to the election told us with differing narratives that we had a problem. we had dysfunction in washington. the republicans said well, we've got all this uncertainty and business feels they're being demonized and don't want to invest money. the democrats essentially said we have tremendous inequality and the middle class isn't stable. until we build a middle class, no thriving economy. we're still there. we voetded for the status quo. the republican position is still, let's not give this president any victories. let's not participate in real sustaining economic recovery and the president, yes, he's stronger than he was before the election. but he's still somewhat constrained. i think the public understands there's a lot of uncertainty. we may go over this cliff. some say it's not a cliff. it's a hill. certainly it would be good to have higher tax rates for wealthier people. it might not be a long-term catastrophe. we get some reform out of it. let's remember, the deals that we're discussing to avert the cliff involve balanc
was up more than 170 points, closing about 13,000 for the first time post election season. the nasdaq um 40 and the s&p 500 up 18. deadly shooting at israel gaza border at the israel gaza border on the second full day of the cease-fire between israel and hamas. israeli troops shot and killed a palestinian man and wounded 19 others according to health officials in gaza. israeli commanders say crowds of palestinians were trying to dang a fence and cross into israel. soldiers only fired of a palestinians ignored warning shots. corner powell live in jerusalem for us. is this affecting the cease-fire? john, this is normally the time of incident that would undermine a cease-fire agreement, particularly because just so little trust between the two sides. but it appears now third day cease-fire is holding. both sides accuse each other of violating the cease-fire. one person from the palestinian area and gaza was killed and 19 others were injured. but that was about as inflammatory as the language got. and, in fact, the top leader from hamas in gaza seemed to indicate that. >> investigate the cas
. they are blaming obamacare on this, but this was before the election the price of health care was going up. across the board, we are not dealing with problems at hand. both sides of the aisle, those that don't want to give an answer to this before we go over the fiscal cliff, they're not responding to the will of the people. they will be voted out. there's no doubt. if we have some very lovely and caring republicans that are very conservative and we love them, but we will vote them out if they don't fix this. we are holding them responsible as we are holding the democrats. host: thanks for the call. we will continue discussing the fiscal cliff and taking your calls. we want to point out some other news going on in the world. here's the front page of the boston globe this morning -- clinton was dispatched by president obama to israel and is meeting today with egyptian officials and palestinian officials as well. the headline from the tribune -- late tuesday night clinton met with benjamin netanyahu in jerusalem and plans to go to the west bank on wednesday. clinton is preparing to step down early n
meetings after the election of 1960, i think they had each come away quite impressed by the other, that kennedy had been describing eisenhower as kind of slow and doddering and not alert to the new realities of the 1960's. he met an extremely forceful and intelligent president of the united states in dwight eisenhower. i think likewise eisenhower was dismissive of a wealthy politician, a much younger man, a senator whom he had not condescended to meet as president. and he also came away as someone who was extremely well versed. so they began to like each other more. and especially during this crisis i think they had a sense of how lonely it is to occupy that office and how you're getting all kinds of advice, you're getting good advice, you're getting a lot of faulty advice, which kennedy was, including from his joint chiefs. eisenhower knew all about faulty military advice, and he was able to speak with his supreme authority about the dangers as well as the advantages of military advice. so he was a very useful ally to president kennedy. >> were you alive during the cuban missile
% unemployment rate down. the place to double down and focus is innovation and entrepreneurship. now the election is over. this is recognition this is important. there are many issues being debated. they are all important issues. the most important thing is making sure we build on this. >> i do not mean to pick on the president. i liked the idea that you start on things where there is a lot of agreement, but looking at trade and who will help. -- looking at trade will help. they do not even know each other, and they have no idea what the common ground is. >> i guess the concern is how apple does not make any thing in america. what does that tell us? we have made the cost and complexity of doing business in this country prohibitive, and we have not risen our skill base enough to have employees that can earn about high wage -- earn the high wage. i think so entrepreneurship is part of the solution and it has been bipartisan to support small business. we have to support of all business. i come back to a lot of this is blocking and tackling. it is being strategic. our alumni are all over the world, a
. and then a look at marriage equality and voters approval of the initiatives on the balance this election year -- ballots this year. >> with soldiers on guard outside the customs house and outside the homes of crown officials and with british artillery now aimed at the house, it is easy to understand why many bostonian felt threatened. soldiers tried to stir up racial tension. of course, not everyone in boston is white. within a month of their arrival, three british officers are discovered encouraging african american slaves in boston to attack their white masters. one of those drunken officers assured the black bostonians that the soldiers had come to procure their freedom. with their help, they should be able to drive the liberty boys to the devil. the british army is not in boston to free the slaves. several white residents lodge complaints. captain wilson and his friends had engaged in a dangerous act to foment slave dissatisfaction. >> a discussion on how veterans are treated when returning from war. we will hear from: paul and general stanley mcchrystal, former commander of troops in --
remember after i was elected for the first time in 93 and i would see a couple of bright white kids in these low-income communities, troubled, challenged neighborhoods, troubled, challenged schools, and then what is that kids story? the teacher tells me those children seem to be so energetic, so effervescent, so much potential and then lo and behold a couple of years later what happened to that kid? he dropped out. he got caught up in the streets. .. >> we reduce the murder rate by 20%. and so all of these indicators are out there, that there's nothing more important than education. so i just became passionate about this. and even to the this day, 15, 19 years later, it's the only thing that keeps me up at night, to know that there are children who are going to wake up in this country who are going to go to school that won't serve them well. and over a short period of time whatever potential that today had, that they were given through stent of birth -- through accident of birth, they will lose. and there's something tragic about that. so, yeah, i was out in front. i said, you know,
that the president was notified on the day of the election. clayton is here to guide you through the best black friday deals. >> you are a cool geek. >> black friday and saving hundreds of bucks stay tuned and grab your coffee. ♪ ♪ you better shop around. is what drives us to broadcast the world's biggest events in 3d, or live to your seat high above the atlantic ocean. it's what drives us to create eco-friendly race tracks, batteries that power tomorrow's cars, nearlyndestructible laptops, and the sustainable smart towns of the future. at panasonic, we're driven to make what matters most better. just another way we're engineering a better world for you. i've been fortunate to win on golf's biggest stages. but when joint pain and stiffness from psoriatic arthritis hit, even the smallest things became difficult. i finally understood what serious joint pain is like. i talked to my rheumatologist and he prescribed enbrel. enbrel can help relieve pain, stiffness, and stop joint damage. because enbrel, etanercept, suppresses your immune system, it may lower your ability to fight infections. ser
roosevelts election derailed from the depression. >> gretchen: stewart varney went back to the 30s and fast forward here. >> not just me. first year of fdr's second term was 1937 and it was a terrible year for the economy. dow jones industrial was cut in half . unemployment 15 percent and it was a depression within the big depression of the 1930s. is the parallels between then and now. fdr raised taxings. president obama is going to raise taxes. many of the big themed policies of the first term of fdr were implemented in the second term. same with president obama and think obama care and financial reform . attacking wall street as the villian. president roosevelt did that . wall street was the villians and shades of that exactly. 2013 president obama wall street is the villiage and then the rearrangement of society. fdr tried to do it. and president obama is doing it and run away government spending. parallels are there and hope it doesn't work out like it did then. >> we want all americans back to work. and back in the 30s industrial plummeted 34 percent in the first year of the second ter
that, some say until after the elections. >> jim, thank you very much. >>> at $267 million u.s. prosecutors call it the most lucrative insider trading scheme ever. we get reaction from the judge who presided over the raj raj rat man trial and which tablet will santa be carrying this year? americans are always reado work hard for a better future. since ameriprise financial was founded back in 1894, they've been committed to putting clients first. helping generations through tough times. good times. never taking a bailout. there when you need them. helping millions of americans over the centuries. the strength of a global financial leader. the heart of a one-to-one relationship. together for your future. ♪ ♪ you can stay in and like something... ♪ [ car alarm deactivates ] ♪ ...or you can get out there with your family and actually like something. ♪ the lexus december to remember sales event is on, offering some of our best values of the year. this he pursuit of perfection. >>> after years of effort the government now directly linking steven cohen to an insider tradin
of these women will be available behind the election of your to sign copies of their buck. reminder on all those fronts. let me introduce three incredible women. 1985 to 1991, governor of vermont. later united states ambassador both of switzerland and liechtenstein and is author of this book, the new feminist agenda. then professor anita hill, a professor of social policy, law, and women's studies at brandeis university and author of this new book, rematching equality, stories of gender, race, and finding a home. welcome. [applause] and senior editor at the atlantic and founder of women section. also the author of the end of man and the rise of women. so we start off with a couple minutes from each of you on -- a brief summary or a story from your book that you think best encapsulates the ideas that you are presenting. >> thank you very much. it is great to see you all up there and to be here with my sister authoress. what is next for women. my career, my political life really started with the woman's movement in the 70's. and we had great expectations, some of which have been at. the very fact
quickly rose to be the voice of democracy in burma, creating the national league for democracy. elections followed in 1990, where her party won 80% of the seats. that joy quickly turned to tragedy. the military junta nullified the election and arrested aung san suu kyi. she would spend the better part of two decades under house arrest, unable even to visit her dying has been -- husband. in 1996, i recall being approached to sponsor a burma sanctions bill. sanctions were only loosened in july of this year. senator mcconnell later became one of aung san suu kyi's chief advocates in the senate and we continued to work on behalf of the people in burma. in 2003, following an assassination attempt, senator mcconnell and i worked to pass an important and that remains in place today, an effort to bring about further reform. and i must say, burma is extremely lucky to have a champion mike aung san suu kyi. in the face of violence, harassment, intimidation, she has never wavered in her pursuit of human rights. she celebrates the release of political prisoners, including the approximately 90 release
when president obama welcomes mexico's president-elect to the white house this week. he will return to mexico's institutional revolutionary power to party after 12 years when he takes office december 1st. he pushed more nor economic reforms and including overhauls of energy and tax laws. >>> supreme court could decide whether to take up the issue of gay marriage this week. the court is set to hold a closed door conference on friday where they can decide whether they will hear any of five challenges to the defense of marriage act or the prop 8 case. the odds are good they will accept one of those cases and the prop 8 case. california's prop eightle limited that to a marriage of man a a woman. >>> they can help you buy a powerball ticket. no one matched all sucks numbers and now it will jump to 325 million to an estimated $45 million for the next drawing slated for wednesday. it is the biggest jackpot in powerball history. powerball tickets are not sold though in california. they are sold in 42 states and including washington, oregon and arizona. incidentally. the winning numbers were
for the presidency in 2008 if he had lost the senate election, not if he had won it. that is the level of national of security we are talking about. >> the professor profiles historic and modern leaders to show the lessons that can be learned from those who have had the greatest impact on their time. he talks on book tv, sunday at 9:00 p.m. and midnight eastern, part of a book tv's holiday >> actor and former california governor arnold schwarzenegger joins a group of executives for a discussion on hollywood impact on culture. this marked the launch of the university of southern california's new schwarzenegger institute. the discussion was moderated by ben smith. from los angeles, this is about an hour and 15 minutes. [applause] >> thank you for turning up for this. it is an honor to be here. anyone who has been uncovering policy in new york kind of feels entertainment industry has this enormous power in politics and public policy, and also as a dark matter out there. we do not fully understand how it is affecting and changing what happens on the east coast. we have a remarkable panel of longtime l
to this personally because now that i am an elected official the corley woman serving on that body and the first woman of color on that body's 102 year history. [applause] >> why does that matter? why is that relevant? i appreciate the applause, nothing to do with a personal achievement. it is the collective and shared victory for all of us. it means the solutions we are developing in government are more comprehensive and fully informed because of the different perspective so i thought a great deal about this issue of attraction and retention but more than that, how do we keep native bostonians? we were losing young people who were raised here and going somewhere else. they do come back and go on this pilgrimage to see what else is out there but they do come back. to the point about social venues this is an issue i am working on. we have 22 distinctive neighborhoods and is easy to be very siloed and what young professionals are looking for and what i was looking for and found when i went outside my campus community is community and human connections and restaurants are revolutionary in this way.
it wrong leading up to election day. the editor in chief for gallop whiched so mitt romney with a bigger lead admits gallup might have overestimated the get-out-the-oat efforts. >>> it's time for a geography quiz. put on your thinking caps. what is the name of this country? all right. if you said mexico, then you were wrong. our neighbors to the south actually go by the official title estados unidos mexicanos which is translated the united mexican states. but felipe calderon is making one last attempt to change the official name to mexico. >>> you weren't the only one tweeting out thanksgiving pictures. cindy mccain grabbed this picture of her husband john mccain. he's in the green cap getting ready to deep fry a turkey. and senator marco rubio is showing off his bird. this is his bird ready to eat. the obama campaign tweeted this black and white picture to mark the holiday showing a much younger first family. and that is your morning dish of "scrambled politics." >>> investors had the day off for thanksgiving and the ones who aren't out shop having to go back to work today. the u.s. mar
'm christine romans. a painful election is behind us. now the hard work begins. creating middle class jobs. it used to be a ticket to the middle class was by making things. but what are we making these days, and where is the middle? take a minute to look around your living room. your tv, the jaens you're wearing, the lamp next to you, all of those things likely aren't made in the usa. it's a trend, of course, long in the making but made worse by the great recession. when more than 2 million manufacturing jobs were lost. since june 2009 when the recession ended, just 241,000-of-those manufacturing jobs have come back. that's according to government data. for years, for years, conventional wisdom was we don't need to make stuff here. we'll invent it in america and then become a service-based economy. well, here we are, and these new service sector jobs aren't paying off, literally. right now a job in the leisure and hospitality sector averages $13 an hour. that's $27,000 a year, if you work full-time. retail, not much better. average hourly rate, about $16 an hour. this is the average. it ta
's a lot of hot spots in the world bubbling up. >> there are, george. this is a critical time. the election may be over. but look ahead. you have iran, who is trying to acquire a nuclear weapon. you have north korea, there's satellite photos just out showing that north korea would like to try to test another long-range ballistic missile. and you have afghanistan. this is such a critical time in afghanistan. they're putting together drawdown plans. and what the u.s. does after 2014. >> the big decision there is how many troops to leave in right now. and then, how quickly to ramp down, going to 2014. >> how quickly. and general john allen who is under investigation because of the e-mails involved in the petraeus affair. >> martha raddatz, thanks very much. >>> we get the rest of the top headlines from josh. >> good morning. we're going to begin with the big ruling affecting big tobacco. a federal judge in washington has ordered the major cigarette makers to take out ads in which they publicly admit they lied about the dangers of smoking. they must take out ads that say that smoking is respons
and that is what we did. there is an election coming up in israel. netanyahu looked like he would achieve reelection there anyway. but internally israel, and abroad in his relationship with the white house what has prime minister benjamin netanyahu achieved? >> well, relations are a little bit warmer, at least for now, i think, between the white house and the israeli prime minister. president obama and netanyahu have not gotten along. that's been well documented. but the united states is now reaching out going to help israel in a new way. so that does strengthen bibi netanyahu's long-term position, as well. >> final question the other actor in the region we've been talking about all of them is egypt, of course. the u.s. has really fallen all over itself thanking egypt for its role in achieving a cease-fire here. but over the last 24 hours, something fascinating happened in egypt. the leader there mohamed morsi game himself immunity from any kind of legal challenge until there is a new constitution in that country. some people say that essentially lines him up to be a dictator. >> well he
to public service i found my passion. i got into education reform largely because as an elected official in washington, d.c. i would visit schools and talk to teachers. after i was elected for the first time in 1993, i would go to school and see a couple of these bright eyed kids in some of these low income communities. troubled, challenge neighborhoods. troubled, challenged schools. i said, what is that kid's story? the teacher would tell me. the kid seemed to be so energetic, so bunch potential. -- so much potential. a couple years later, i hear he got dropped out. that kid never could read. it struck me when i looked at the negative social indicators in washington, d.c. -- similar to other countries around the country -- all the negative social stuff was directly related to the lack of education. 90% of the inmates in d.c. were high-school dropouts. in terms of homelessness, joblessness, drug addiction -- there are statistics out there now that if we increase the high-school graduation rates in this country by 10%, we reduce the murder rate by 20%. all of these indicators show that th
times reports that prior to election day, the obama administration was developing a rule book for unmanned aircraft strikes on terrorists so that if romney won he would inherit clear guidelines. the issues are not as urgent now. obama won allegedly, but the administration is still pushing to formalize the rules and nail down exactly when deadly force is justified. they are debating whether drones should be a last resort against imminent threat to our country or something else like in pakistan where they are deployed against militants whose main grudge is with pakistani authoritiesment the president has miss givings telling one interviewer, quote, there is a remotist to it that helps us think somehow we can solve vexing security problems. for more, let's go live to qet red eye"'s correspondent chip herrington. >> i don't know how he got his security credentials. are we going too far with drones or not far enough? >> you are solving vexing security problems which is a nice why the stuff, but how do you do uj judge, jury and the such. you turn them into lengthy decisions and how
've got a house election in two years -- less than two years. >> although, i don't think this is about electoral politics right now. this is about -- this is about dollars and cents for specific interest groups, constituents, supporters of these politicians and their ideological views. so, look, it's not easy to do. and i believe at the end they'll do it, but this is part of the dance, you know, before it gets super intense. >> and you know what else it is? it's sausage being made and it's ugly to watch. but then -- and then i think about closing loopholes. and name your loophole, and i can give you a two-year argument. mortgage. oh, it's going to kill the housing industry, charity, we can talk for two years, what will it do to charity? >> universities and -- yes. >> you name any sacred cow. that's why it's sacred, it's a sacred cow. >> state and local tax deductions, oh, my god, what's that going to do to new york? >> is it easier to do the cap and that gives you the nebulous, well, we're not hurting anyone -- >> yes. >> would that work? >> yes. i mean, a lot of tax policy experts lik
the politics are currently after the election. economists usually determine policy prior to tax rates. host: we are host: we are running out of time to give final thoughts as we conclude. what do you think is next on this debate? guest: we are weeks away from a deadline. an important one. where not only our tax policy is going to change but significant spending cuts are slated to take effect as well. i'm actually a little bit more concerned today than i was a day or two ago. in the sense at the moment policymakers are moving in opposite directions. in part that's the ways of washington and i think we'll see a few collapses before we ultimately get together somewhere in the days before christmas on a compromise. we have been talking about marginal tax rates, which i think are a key part not only of the budget question, but a key part of the broader economic question in terms of economic growth. and i'm hopeful that any solution that comes together is going to think a lot about economic growth and not just budgets. host: ethan? guest: i think i may be a little more hopeful than alex is. i think t
i did called recount about the gore-bush election there are circumstance is where people make decisions or misjudgments or behave in such ways that you cannot actually believe that you couldn't write this stuff. because it's so outrageous. it's inherently funny. >> thanks for coming in mr. spacey. thanks very much. >> coming up. john loves the -- loves the has a few things to say about the comedy club. what i said and why it went viral which frank solid shocking to me. okay, here's the plan. you have a plan? first we're gonna check our bags for free, thanks to our explorer card. then, the united club. my motr was so wrong about you. next, we get priory boarding on our flight i booked with miles. all because of the card. and me. okay, what's the plan? plan? mm-hmm. we're on vacation. there is no plan. really? [ male announcer ] the united mileageplus explorer card. the mileage card with speci perks on united. get it and you're in. adt can help you turn on a few lights... ♪ ...bring family in from the cold... ♪ ...even let you know when an old friend has arrived. ♪ now get
that binder by a group of female advocates ahead of the election. by the other thing we've got to look at is women's resumes. if we're really going to of women in administered position and private sector, the public sector, we have to recognize that they are different, at least from my generation. there may be blind spots when you were raising her children, that's a very precious time. you know what's going on in your community. you volunteered. so a man looking at a resume will favor a resume that looks pretty much like his. as a woman, when i interviewed a woman who went to law school after she raised her kids, i immediately understood what that resume meant, even though she undersold herself in the interview. you can imagine she got the job. so if we're going to have women in places, we can't have authority, we can't always expect them to be just like men, even in their life story. and the question of qualify, they may be more qualified by having a slightly different resume that really has enriched their experience and let them do a better job. >> i heard a story, resource on tommy
and also about former presidents. mitchell turner has more michele. >> the election is not until february but the candidacy is already getting a lot of support. it is the race for best picture. >> league and is a sensational his best in many, many years it is the best, lincoln. >> he is tracking of the early oscar favorites. we are starting to look at 1, 2, 3, 4 revolutionary. argo has been great and well received. >> and also, the life of pi which is extraordinary. it is a wonderful bradley cooper comedy with deniro. >> they could double down on double seven. >> with a sky full people are starting to talk about change spawned in the best picture race which is a good possibility stif skyfall and javiar is amazing.. >> and also dame judy dench could get a nomination. the oscar race is far from set possible contenders have not even opened. >> leave as r les miserables and the big musical.. and people are actually hoping that it is not one of the tightest best actor race is hyoscine. there is anthony hopkins as alfred hitchcock and, hitchcock and daniel day- lewis as abraham lincoln. >> he c
running for the presidency in 2008 -- if he had lost the illinois senate election, that is the level of national security we're talking about. >> we profiled historic and modern leaders to show the lessons that can be learned for those who have had the greatest impact on the issues of their time. this is on book-tv "afterwards" at 9:00 p.m. and midnight eastern on sunday on c-span 2. >> what about if the soviet union announced tomorrow that if we attack cuba, it will be a nuclear war? >> this thing is so serious. we are going to be an easy and we know what is happening now. you've got to use something. something may make these people shoot them off but i don't think as well. i will say this -- i must keep my own people very alert. >> have to hang on tight. >> it is amazing that eisenhower tells him to have his people alerts. everyone is completely on edge so course they are alert and kennedy lapse. he jocularly says hang on tightly to some nice moments on this terribly tense day. they are able to joke a little bit with each other and especially during this crisis, i think, they had a
obama was elected was a call to not only in the war in iraq, which he did, but also as he put it, he claims he would and the mindset that leads to war. unfortunately quite the opposite has happened. we have had an expansion of wars particularly through the drawn wars and one of the things that is so ironic about that is that along with all of the deaths of civilians and frankly people who are on those lists for reasons that we don't always know when we don't know who put them on the list, where it is that intelligence come from and how reliable is that? it's usually problematic on a host of levels but particularly the level of civilians who are killed for no reason these drone strikes and how that antagonizes people across these countries. that is exactly the opposite of the idea of looking for new ways to solve the conflict, ways of looking at ways to avoid the mindset. this is exactly reflecting the mindset of war. so this in my view is the biggest violation if you will of the promises that president obama made from the time he was elected four years ago. >> host: let's go to marcy
has been widely called the most presidential election of our lifetimes given that the choice between the two men running for office is very, very different. as we're in the final days, let me ask you this last question. do you see greater challenges facing cities, boston in the particular, under a mitt romney presidency as opposed to a continued barack obama presidency, and, ed, i'm going to start with you. >> i think the track record of the national government with cities is very, very weak, and i think that that's true under both parties. occasionally, very well meaning but weak, and occasionally not so well meaning but weak. and i think that's the larger challenge, how to create an urban agenda that actually makes sense. one that doesn't and, again, you know, this means pushing back on policies that mean massive spending on highways with general tax revenues. i mean, president obama's the most urban president we've had since ted key roosevelt in many -- teddy roosevelt in many ways. the latest highway bill, we had a mass infusion of general revenues instead of gas taxes to pay for
biden will meet with mexico's president-elect today. pena kneeate toe has a new message. in an editorial in "the washington post" he said the u.s./mexico relations need to go beyond drugs and security concerns. topping his list, deepening economic ties with the united states. >>> the remains of former palestinian leader yasser arafat were exhumed this morning from a mausoleum in the west bank. many palestinians believe that arafat was poisoned by israel when he died in 2004. now, an international team of scientists will analyze tissue samples to see if they contain any traces of a radioactive substance. the actual cause of arafat's death was never determined. >>> the egyptian people taking to the streets to mourn the death of a 16-year-old activist. and to voice their opposition to president mohamed morsi and the muslim brotherhood. this ireport showing protesters as they carried the teenager's casket through tahrir square to a cemetery. moresy's edict that the supreme court cannot overturn decisions he's made since coming into office in june or over the next six months is meeting a lot
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